I have only just realised that, while I posted about individual exhibits on the Facebook Page, I have not done so here - sacrilegious! I'll be introducing some of the exhibits individually, so, without further ado, here is my thinking behind "Pocket-sized Grief":

The series "Pocket-sized Grief" consists of small, palm-sized sculptures, based on the Kübler-Ross model, which points towards five stages of grief. While not all stages may be experienced, it has been used in counselling and therapy since 1969. For me, it was important to create pieces that are personal - small enough to hide in a pocket, just as grief is often hidden by the individual, tucked away out of sight from the outside world - but also tactile, inviting handling, running a thumb across a groove, or simply being comforted by the shape inside the hand or pocket. Just like grief cannot be pushed away and examined from afar, these sculptures invite others to engage, to occupy themselves with the pieces, at an intimate, personal level.

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1. "Denial" - a smile, a closed eye lid - "I'm okay, everything is fine, don't worry!" But the glass is crackled, the smile breaking, the truth forcing its way into eyes that do not want to see.

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2. "Anger" - the inside of a fist, cast and personalised to fit just one person - this is *my* anger, why is this happening to me? Yet, the shape is perfectly contained within the hand, and so the outside world may never know what goes on inside.

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3. "Bargaining" - a weight to throw on the scales, "I would give anything, if only...". But inside the weight, a person, reminiscent of a games piece of a board game, because, in attempting pointless bargains, we only play with ourselves, and fool nobody.

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4. "Depression" - an opaque black sphere, caught on the inside, there appears to be no light, and no way out. The cork is pushed in so hard that access from the outside is difficult, while others try to help, it is the person on the inside who must push upward, forward, onward, out of the darkness.

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5. "Acceptance" - "no use crying over spilt milk", the past will not return, no matter how much we want it to. A glib statement, yet it holds a truth both fundamental and unavoidable. Acceptance slowly dawns. And yet, also the shape of a tear...nobody promised that acceptance would equate happiness.

 


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